Work Injuries and Illnesses by Race or Ethnic Origin

Not Reporting Race or Ethnic Origin is Increasing

As discussed on the Brief tab, several data limitations affect our ability to understand the risks faced by workers in different race or ethnic origin groups. The primary limitation is that 45% of nonfatal cases involving days away from work in 2020 did not include race or ethnic origin information. Non-reporting of race or ethnic origin is getting worse, steadily increasing from 37.2% in 2011. Because of this issue, all nonfatal estimates available are likely underestimating the actual number of injuries and illnesses in a particular race or ethnic origin group.

  • Chart
  • Data Table

Comparing the nonfatal injury and illness experience among the four largest race or ethnic origin groups, there are some notable differences:

  • Year with most nonfatal cases:
    • 2011 for white workers
    • 2020 for Hispanic or Latino workers
    • 2020 for Black or African American workers
    • 2020 for Asian workers
  • Age of worker experiencing the most cases:
    • 55 to 64 for white workers
    • 35 to 44 for Hispanic or Latino workers
    • 45 to 54 for Black or African American workers
    • 45 to 54 for Asian workers
  • Length of service experiencing the most cases:
    • More than five years for white workers
    • One to five years for Hispanic or Latino workers
    • One to five years for Black or African American workers
    • More than five years for Asian workers

Use the interactive chart to explore nonfatal cases involving days away from work by race or ethnic origin group.

  • Chart
  • Data Table
How to Use Injury Facts® Charts and Tables

Source: NSC analysis of BLS data