Emergency Vehicles

In 2017, 143 people died in crashes involving emergency vehicles. The majority of these deaths were occupants of non-emergency vehicles; about a quarter were pedestrians. The majority of these deaths (68%) occurred in multiple-vehicle crashes. Crashes involving police vehicles accounted for the most deaths (102), followed by fire trucks (24), and ambulances (17). Use the interactive chart to explore more trends by changing crash year, emergency vehicle type, and emergency status.

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How to Use Injury Facts® Charts and Tables

Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Traffic safety facts annual report tables. Downloaded on 7-26-19.

A recent study highlights the potential increase in crash risk when ambulances operate with lights and sirens. When an ambulance responds to an emergency call without using lights and sirens, the crash rate is 4.6 per 100,000 responses. The crash rate increases to 5.5 when lights and sirens are used. The increase in risk is even greater when the ambulance is transporting a victim. The crash risk without lights and sirens is 7.0 per 100,000 transports, and increases to 16.5 when lights and sirens are used throughout the transport.

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Source: Watanabe, B.L., Patterson, G.S., Kempema, J.M, Magallanes, O., & Brown, L.H. (2019). Is use of warning lights and sirens associated with increased risk of ambulance crashes? A contemporary analysis using national EMS information system (NEMSIS) data. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 74(1).